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Thursday, April 03, 2014

World Newsmedia Innovation Study that identifies present concerns and future priorities is now available free to participants

For the past four years, the World Newsmedia Innovation Study has chronicled major strategy innovation and revenue making trends in news media companies around the world. 

Key findings from the 2013 study, which was conducted by Martha Stone of the World Newsmedia Network and François Nel of the Journalism Leaders Programme at UCLan, shows:
  •  Two thirds of the executives surveyed made product development their No 1 efficiency strategy, while a third say they plan to collaborate more with other companies to generate content. Much lower down on the agenda are staff cuts (23 %) and outsourcing (15%)
  •  Looking ahead, nearly one in five respondents said they expect that over the next five years between 21% and 30% of their revenues will have to come from sources outside traditional advertising and subscriptions. The range of platforms where they see opportunities vary greatly, but social media tops the list. 
"The project is aimed at helping us all better understand and quantify our industry's responses to the challenges across the news company value chain - and we're happy to share the findings with those who participate," said Nel.

There are 21 questions, and it will take  about 10 to 12 minutes to complete. The survey is available in English  HERE and in other languages below. Of course,  personal and company’s identity will remain confidential.

media innovation insight
A 14-page summary of the 2013 report can be downloaded  by those who contribute to the fifth annual global survey. And to thank participants further, respondents can also receive a free copy of the 2014 when it is published in the autumn.   

"With the study now entering its fifth year, we expect to get deep insight into how executives from different regions have viewed  present challenges and what are their priorities for growth over the next five years," said Nel. "With the survey now available  in 10 languages, including Persian, we're also keen to link up with researchers from other parts of the world to help us analyse the data and share the findings in the various languages."  

For more information about the project, contact  François Nel  at fpnel @ uclan.ac.uk 

The survey is also available in the following languages:  Arabic,  Chinese ,  French , German,  Persian  Portuguese,  Russian , Spanish, and Turkish 

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Mastering Leadership: Why Daily News publisher Jethro Goko stepped out of the newsroom into the classroom - and back again

Of this there’s no doubt: Jethro Goko isn’t easily persuaded. Or intimidated.

Jethro Goko
When Zimbabwe’s fiercely-independent Daily News’ printing presses were blown up in 2001 and then banned by Robert Mugabe’s administration in 2003,  many thought that would be end of the legendary paper with its bold claim of ‘telling it like it is’. Not so. Though Jethro, who had been on the paper's board, had moved to South Africa to take up senior editorial roles at Avusa (now Times Media), he continued a legal battle to regain the paper's license to publish. When that was finally granted in 2009, he refined his business plan and relaunched the newspaper in March 2011. 

During much of that period, Jethro made regular trips to Preston for seminars and workshops offered by the Journalism Leaders Programme at UCLanThis past summer, which also coincided with Mugabe's latest election victory, Jethro doggedly wrapped up his dissertation research and will today [04/12/2013] be earning his Master of Arts in Journalism Leadership with Merit. 

It’s been quite a journey for Jethro and we wanted to find out just why he undertook it - and what he  takes away from it.  In this email exchange with the programme's founding director François Nel (also originally from Zimbabwe) Jethro, well, tells it like it is. 

FN Typically, media executives consider that they can learn all they need to know from the person ahead of them on corporate ladder and by keeping an eye on their direct competitors.  Why did you do it?  

JG  I chose to participate in the Journalism Leaders Programme because it offered me almost everything that I was looking for at the time, for my continued professional growth, after more than two decades in journalism  [ed note: including roles as deputy editor of Business Day and editor-in-chief of The Herald and Weekend Post] . 

FN The programme has non-academic routes for those who just want to attend residential sessions, as well as an academic route with exit points at postgraduate certificate, post graduate diploma and Master of Arts levels. Why did you keep going to the end - including writing a research dissertation - even though you already have an MBA degree and had so much going on professionally? 

JG In addition to the intellectual stimulation, the programme presented me with an invaluable opportunity to interact and exchange notes with other editors and media managers from around the world in a fairly relaxed setting.

Very crucially too, its thrust was geared towards strategic new media management, at a time that the 'old' brick and mortar business models of our industry were showing serious strain everywhere in the world.

The programme also challenged participants to look at how they managed their newsrooms and businesses more critically and honestly than the average academic course would otherwise do.

Although initially, my intention was to participate in the programme only for the first few core courses, those first three residential gatherings in that first year were so stimulating and beneficial that I was compelled to continue with the rest of the programme. While my MBA studies had been very useful in honing my overall business and analytical skills, the JLP programme zeroed in on my area of interest -- media strategies, and specifically new media trends, challenges and opportunities -- all of which proved invaluable in my work with my then employer as well as when I later branched out on my own.

FN How would you summarise your JLP experience?

JG I am so glad that I participated in the programme. It is relaxed, yet both challenging academically and very nicely practical at the same time, a balance that is often lacking in programmes of this nature. To that extent, it was by far the most enjoyable, relevant and beneficial course I've ever participated in.

FN What advice do you have for media company executives who have balance short-term demands of delivering shareholder value with the need to grows the talent they required to innovating their business? 

JG My advice to pressurised media executives is to think long-term rather than short-term when it comes to looking after their most valuable resource -- their people. Even though sending their staff to participate in this kind of course may look relatively expensive in the short-term, it will have lasting long-term benefits.

It also ensures that their editors and managers are well-equipped to handle the stresses that are so much a part of managing in our industry these days. In our often surprisingly insular industry, this programme undoubtedly broadens both experiences and perspectives.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Journalism Leadership INSIGHT: Lessons for innovators by those leading and transforming the media business

The inaugural Journalism Leadership Insight report isn't only created for those on the frontline of the media industry – it draws on original research by those leading and transforming the business. 

Original research by those leading and innovating the media business
Download the free report here.
“The report offers much-needed insights into the challenges we face by the very people driving innovation in our sector,” said the report’s editor François Nel, director of the Journalism Leaders Programme at UCLan. “The practical leadership lessons they draw from their studies couldn’t be more relevant.”
  • Daily Post, Wales editor Alison Gow examined the evolving role of the editor and the competencies required to face the challenges of operating in an increasing complex and competitive media.
  • Dilyan Damyanov, director of information services at Aii Data Processing in Bulgaria , investigated a slew of new ways that publishers could sell their content. 
  • Aware that the intention to innovate is no guarantee of success , Times Media Group’s head of journalism training  Paddi Clay paused to critically reflect on a specific case when newsroom innovation didn’t deliver.  
  • Steve Matthewson managing editor: news at Business Day and BDlive, explored the social media strategies and practices at two UK newspapers with significant global reach, The Guardian and The Financial Times.
  • Laurice Taitz-Buntman, the director of In Your Pocket City Guides, South Africa,  considered the challenges top executives face in fostering an innovation culture within their organisations.
All five executives who contributed to this report set out to further equip themselves for the challenge of driving change by enrolling in the pioneering Journalism Leadership Programme at UCLan. These articles are drawn from their final dissertations for the MA in Journalism Leadership which were supervised by François Nel and Mac McCarthy with additional support from Megan Knight and George Ogola. 

Journalism Leadership Insight is free to download  and collaborators on future reports are invited.

Friday, May 31, 2013

#LGMC2013UK Leadership and Governance for Media & Communications executive programme UK 2013 Study Visit

This spring, the Journalism Leaders Programme team at UCLan started collaborating with the prestigious School of Media and Communication at Pan African University in Lagos, Nigeria, to launch another innnovative course for forward-thinking senior professionals who want to development their companies and themselves: the Leadership and Governance for Media and Communications programme.

LGMC Flyer
As part of the 10-week certificate course, participants are taking a week-long  study visit to the UK to explore the impact of digital networked technologies on UK communication businesses and the business of communication - and what the lessons might be for forward-thinking Nigerian organisations who operate in an increasingly connected, competitive and globalised context.

Led by François Nel, the founding director of the Journalism Leaders Programme,  the group will have opportunities to explore the challenges and changes at some of the world's most innovative private and public sector organisations in London, Manchester and Preston, including News International,Talk About Local, Unilever, BBC, The Cooperative, Manchester Digital Development Agency, Trinity Mirror and UCLan, the first modern university in the UK to be listed in the QS World Rankings.

In line with the JLeaders ethos, participants won't only be 'talking digital,' but also 'doing digital'. So, while many of our conversations will be confidential and the Chatham House Rule will apply throughout, we'll still be sharing (some of) our adventures and impressions through this live blog and through the Twitter hashtag #LGMC2013UK. We look forward to the week of learning - and welcome questions and suggestions from others who share our interests.


Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Mastering Leadership: A Conversation with Times Media's Paddi Clay

This much is clear: Paddi Clay is a master of journalism.


Journalism Leaders graduate Paddi Clay
But just why, after three decades working across the industry in roles ranging from African correspondent for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, to award-winning columnist for The Herald, to managing editor of a leading South African news website TimesLive, did Clay enrol in the Journalism Leaders Programme at UCLan?
 
Since the programme was established in 2006, we've engaged with hundreds of editors and senior journalists from many of the UK's leading media houses, including Johnston Press, Trinity Mirror, Guardian Media Group and Cumbrian Newspapers, as well as others around the world through a wide variety of activities - from non-academic workshops, conferences, seminars and training courses, to postgraduate certificates and diplomas.
But last December Clay was amongst a group of five talented editors from South Africa, Bulgaria and the UK who became the first to earn the Master of Arts in Journalism Leadership award from the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, home the UK's oldest journalism programme. Others who also pressed through to the end were Alison Gow,  Dilyan Damyanov, LauriceTaitz-Buntman and Steve Matthewson.
In this, the last in a series of conversations with the graduates, we wanted to find out about just why Clay, who is head of training at Times Media and a long-standing South African National Editors Forum council member, invested in the experience - and what advice she had for other journalists (and their organisations) who want to keep learning about leadership.  


Traditionally, journalists have moved up the career ladder by learning all they can from the person on the rung  above. Why did you choose to participate in the Journalism Leaders Programme?  

I was working in a newspaper company (although my most of my working career as a journalist was in electronic media) and starting to feel the pressure being exerted by digital media. I was eager to add another platform to my belt and overcome my fear that this latest wave of new technology would leave me behind. After all, I began my career in an era with telexes and no cell phones.  

I was keen to find out how, why and where, digital differed from print or electronic as far as journalism, and especially news, was concerned, as well as what it would require of managers of the process in the future. As a trainer of young journalists I also needed to know what digital media was all about and how to prepare them for a future that was starting to look very different from our past.There was no one directly above me I could learn from. In fact, very few older or more experienced people seemed to be paying much attention to digital developments in the company, but I knew that I had to keep track of  this new terrain if I was to remain relevant as a trainer and to our new recruits. A few South African universities were going digital in their journalism departments but were very focussed on the technical creation of sites and multimedia, or the "democracy" of citizen journalism. I wanted to find out how this new medium would affect the business of media and news and our relationship with our target market - our readers, listeners and users. The Uclan programme's combination of journalism and business expertise  impressed me and I thought it could be useful for many of our newspaper editors as we started dealing  with the digital future, not only to have access to people with expertise but also colleagues in the newspaper and media world outside of  South Africa.

The Journalism Leaders Programme offers non-academic routes for those who just want to attend residential sessions, as well as an academic route with exit points at postgraduate certificate, post graduate diploma and Master of Arts levels. Why did you keep going to the end – including writing a research dissertation?

After more than 30 years  journalism, and never having formally studied media or journalism,   I really enjoyed the readings in the programme  and the thinking. debate and discussion that was provoked by the lecturers and presenters, and in our groups. I did not want the modules to end - and the Masters dissertation was one way of  extending my learning. I would get to read, think and debate, talk more on the issues I was interested in with other people, clarify my thoughts.  Looking at it now I realise it was  really like producing  and gathering information for a very long feature piece, with as many quotes as possible, by deadline. Of course, the academic disciplines were a bit of a challenge - but we all have to learn to write in a different style now and then.

How did  your company Times Media (formerly Avusa) benefit from your participation? 

I started the programme as the company I worked for  embarked on its digital voyage and I was able to draw on what I was learning in the Programme to make input into the process and projects underway at work. I also was able to change the focus of our training of intern journalists to make them far more marketable and employable in the future. But mostly I think I was enabled to bridge the gap between experienced old hacks and enthusiastic, young digital media acolytes, and demonstrate that it was possible to be part of. and contribute to, this new journalism world even as a "mature" journalist and media manager.

While I was doing  the programme I  was given the role of Content Director to help move our fairly static website to a breaking news site and I was later appointed Managing Editor on the website which became the focus for my Master's dissertation.

How would you summarise your JLP experience? 

Challenging, stimulating, eye-opening and hard work. It was wonderful to be able to  reflect on the role of journalism in society and the business of journalism, to be pushed to be innovative and to be given access to knowledge and tools  that would help me understand the new digital media terrain, as well as  devise ways to manage people and projects through this radical  period of change. I had done a Certificate in Management a couple of years before starting on the Programme but the JLP was in another league; totally customised to practitioners in media and specific to our needs,  awash with visitors  on the cutting edge of digital media  and  given substance by excellent teaching staff and the energy and dedication of Programme Director François Nel .


The first and only programme of its kind in the UK, the Journalism Leaders Programme continues to work with leading publishers from around the world, such as News International, to provide custom courses that help equip exceptional talent for leadership. For more information, contact François  Nel at FPNel @ uclan.ac.uk .

Monday, February 11, 2013

Mastering Leadership: A Conversation with Laurice Taitz-Buntman


Preston hasn't only been at the forefront of UK journalism education and training for more than 50 years. It's also become the place where journalism leaders worldwide learn.  

Since the Journalism Leaders Programme was established by François Nel in 2006, we've engaged with hundreds of editors and senior journalists from many of the UK's leading media houses, including Johnston Press, Trinity Mirror, Guardian Media Group and Cumbrian Newspapers, as well as others around the world through a wide variety of activities - from non-academic workshops, conferences, seminars and training courses, to postgraduate certificates and diplomas.

JLP graduate Laurice Taitz-Buntman
But last December five talented editors from South Africa, Bulgaria and the UK became the first to earn the Master of Arts in Journalism Leadership award from the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, home the UK's oldest journalism programme. Alison Gow,  Dilyan Damyanov,   Laurice Taitz-Buntman (left) Paddi Clay, and Steve Matthewson were the first ones to have pressed through to the end.

We wanted to find out about just why they invested in the experience. Here are the views of Laurice Taitz-Buntman, the former managing editor of the Times Online (now TimesLive) in South Africa, who heads the iSchoolAfrica Youth Press Team programme that is working with 21 South African schools, corporate and government sponsors and broadcast partners to train secondary school students to create newsworthy video content for television.

 Traditionally, journalists have moved up the career ladder by learning all they can from the person on the rung above them. Why did you choose to participate in the Journalism Leaders Programme?

Journalism is changing, and more than at any other time journalists are being confronted with the impact of global and technological shifts, the dissolution of traditional boundaries between the work and the business of journalism, and the audience and our role as purveyors of news. When I entered the programme I was working as a senior manager at one of South Africa's largest newspapers, in an organization grappling with transforming the newsroom from a purely print-based organisation to one more able to cope with the demands of a digital age. The kinds of changes being experienced had little precedent and it was clear that a new skillset was demanded. I chose the Journalism Leaders Programme because it combined a management programme with a focus on digital journalism.

The Journalism Leaders Programme offers non-academic routes for those who just want to attend residential sessions, as well as an academic route with exit points at postgraduate certificate, post graduate diploma and Master of Arts levels. Why did you keep going to the end – including writing a research dissertation – even though you already have a MA degree?

At the time of enrolling in the programme I had worked as a journalist for more than 10 years but had never studied journalism. My MA was in African Literature and while it served me well as a journalist in terms of giving me a more nuanced understanding of African politics, society and writing I grew increasingly hungry for a more  in-depth perspective of my chosen field. Each residential session stirred greater interest and a desire to find answers to particular questions. Completing my MA degree allowed me to focus on an area of journalism culture in an in-depth way which I found highly satisfying. Journalists are expected to master many subject areas and to do so with a weekly or even daily deadline in place. Taking the time to do in-depth research felt like an enormous privilege but also an opportunity to add knowledge to a profession I feel so strongly about. 

How would you summarise your JLP experience?
 
Some of the words that come to mind are challenging, fulfilling, a little maddening but mostly incredibly exciting. The residential weeks fired up electrical circuits in my brain with fresh ideas, debate and provocative discussions. My fellow students, media professionals with wide-ranging experience internationally, and the outstanding faculty led by Francois Nel made each visit to Preston precious time in which to be inspired and intellectually refueled. The JLP provided not only the big ideas, but ways to think about practical implementation. In addition, the opportunity to step outside the newspaper's deadlines and speak to and hear from journalists with diverse skills and to gain a global perspective was an invaluable experience. 
Earlier we also posted conversations with  Alison Gow , editor of the Daily Post in Wales; Dilyan Damyanov,  Editorial Director of Information Services at AII Data Processing in Sofia; and Steve Matthewson, Managing Editor: News, BDlive and Business Day in South Africa. We plan to post conversations withthe other graduates over the coming weeks. 

The first and only programme of its kind in the UK, the Journalism Leaders Programme continues to work with innovating publishers from around the world, such as News International, to provide custom courses that help equip exceptional talent for leadership. For more information, contact François Nel at FPNel @ uclan.ac.uk .

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Journalism thought leaders consider 2013

Effective leaders consider both present realities and future possibilities.
 
In this podcast Journalism.co.uk technology editor Sarah Marshall spoke to seven industry thought leaders from both sides of the Atlantic  - including both Journalism Leaders Programme director François Nel and recent alumnus Alison Gow, editor of the Daily Post - about their expectations of the types of devices that will be used to access news sites, ideas on sustainability, key social networks and platforms for newsgathering, engagement strategies – and the kind of people we might find in the newsroom of 2013.

Also contributing are: Aron Pilhofer, editor of interactive news, New York Times; John Barnes, managing director of digital and tech at Incisive Media and chair of the AOP (Association of Online Publishers);  Mark Little, founder and chief executive of social news agency Storyful;  Raju Narisetti, managing editor, WSJ Digital Network, Wall Street Journal;  Stephen Pinches, group product manager for FT.com.